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Netflix

  • While online video services and original series go hand and hand on the internet these days there are still differences in the way online services are handled by different services. To start out with is release schedules are different depending on the service you are using to start with networks like HBO, CBS, FX and others with a channel release shows on a weekly schedule since they air the shows on the network then offer them on demand afterward online. Service like Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, and Amazon Prime that offer online original content with no network have options for how they can release content. Netflix chooses to release all content at once so people can watch all episodes at their leisure or watch the entire series all at once. Netflix is the service that coined the term binge watching. Amazon Prime tapes pilots of shows then release them for free to everyone to vote on. Then the series that win the voting get released exclusively on Amazon Prime and Amazon Prime Video. Amazon has a little advantage here while many people get the service because they have prime some 7 million people subscribe just for the video streaming service itself. YouTube does a similar thing like Amazon Prime they release the entire series all at once but only the first episode is free on YouTube the rest of the series is available only if you subscribe to YouTube Premium (YouTube Red). YouTube has a little advantage over other services since YouTube Premium offers music, commercial-free YouTube viewing and better YouTube viewing experience on mobile. Users who subscribe to YouTube Premium get more than just series which is a large reason why they are getting lots of new YouTube Premium subscribers. Hulu is kind of doing its own thing releasing originals...
  • I would like to talk about a common thing people say that really is not correct. The first thing is everyone insists that Netflix killed their favorite local mom and pop video store or the Blockbuster at their local grocery store. This is incredibly not true for someone like me who covers the tech news daily.  Netflix if you remember did the DVD by mail business with the tagline “no late fees keep the movie as long as you want.” Many people jumped on this bandwagon but a lot did not as well. Netflix’s online streaming at that time was limited to pretty much B movies and no series on their streaming service. Blockbuster started to offer the same kind of services rent movie no late fees to compete and things were still going ok for video store industry.  Netflix had another hurdle to contend with which was they had to wait 60 to 90 days to start shipping new releases which still gave video stores and Walmart’s a chance to rent and sell new releases to make money.  The thing that really killed the mom and pop video stores was on demand. When companies like Time Warner and other cable providers let you rent new releases on the day they came out without having to go to the local video store.  Then Apple popularity of the iPhone really was the final blow to video stores. The fact you could rent a new release right on the go using iTunes without even needing to be home was the final blow to video stores and a big hit to cable companies.  Amazon, Google, YouTube and many others would start selling and renting new releases on mobile and cloud-based platforms and that becomes the end of the video stores. Many people say it was Netflix that...
  • August 20, 2017

    GLOW On Another Streaming Service?

    GLOW (Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling) is Netflix’s new hit series starring Alison Brie and Betty Gilpin. The show centers around an out of work actress Ruth played by Alison Brie living in Los Angeles in the ’80s. Betty Gilpin plays Debbie an out of work soap actress. Debbie and Ruth are ex-friends forced to work together to headline a wrestling show with 10 other women and a washed-up director of “B” movies who tries to lead a group of women to fame. The series debuted all 10 episodes on June 23, 2017, on Netflix and was renewed for a second season on August 10, 2017, via Twitter. GLOW is definitely a hit Netflix Original Series. The question many people have asked would GLOW have done better on another streaming service. I think the logical choice for me personally for a show like this would have been WWE Network. If your subscribing to the WWE Network your obviously a wrestling fan which fits this shows premise. Hulu was a possible choice since Hulu does host past episodes of WWE Raw, Smackdown and NXT. I think the issue with Hulu is they are still stuck in the old way of thinking releasing one episode a week. When you watch GLOW, it had a very Netflix binge watch feeling to it with the ending of each episode not having a huge cliffhanger like a typical weekly show does on Hulu. The one network I think that could have possibly had this series was HBO. Due to some of the adult topics and content in the GLOW series I could not see Hulu (owned by Disney) picking up this series. HBO even with their style of releasing an episode a week has an audience that I think has the proper demographic on that Sunday 9 o’clock...
  • August 11, 2017

    Microsoft Is Now A Linux Company

    We start out the show talking about a lot of news coming out of the Microsoft camp. We talk about consumer reports and the Microsoft Surface. We talk about Netflix news and David Letterman returning to late night on Netflix. Google has a new messenger app plus Microsoft now supports more Linux than ever. Consumer Reports: Microsoft Surface is Dead Last for Reliability Microsoft Issues a Major Update to OneDrive on iOS Disney starting their own streaming service removing Netflix David Letterman Returning to TV With Netflix Talk Show Microsoft Announced New Outlook.com Beta YouTube Uptime is Another Google Messenger AMD Confirms Linux Performance Marginality Problem Microsoft is Changing Windows 10 to Meet Kaspersky Demands You Can Test Windows Subsystem for Linux on Windows Server in Preview Chrome OS set to get trackpad pinch-to-zoom, launcher gestures, and back button
  • June 2, 2017

    Tech Geek Weekly: June 2

    Groove Music Pass Microsoft had been trying hard to get users onto Groove. Microsoft with the failure of Zune is still trying to break into the music business. Microsoft Groove is now offering until June 30th a special if you purchase a 1-year Groove Music Pass and get $25 to buy apps, games, music, movies, TV and more! Xbox Game Pass Launches June 1 The Netflix for video gaming is finally here Microsoft announced Xbox Game Pass back in February, and the service goes live for the entire Xbox community on June 1. The new digital gaming subscription service gives you unlimited access to over 100 Xbox One and Backward Compatible Xbox 360 games for $9.99 USD per month. Netflix Released House of Cards Season 5 Netflix this week released a new season of House of Cards. The fifth season of the show has been hit with positive reviews. House of Cards was Netflix first original series and is considered one of the favorites by many Netflix subscribers. HP’s Cortana speaker Debut Microsoft revealed earlier this month that HP is planning to build a Cortana-powered speaker. We learned from HP earlier in the week that the speaker will need to be connected to a Windows 10 PC. HP appears to have created the hardware device as a companion to its Windows product line, there’s no release date or pricing for HP’s digital assistant hardware quite yet. Skype Gets Snapchat Like Features Microsoft announced a major redesign of Skype, which now comes with a feature called “Highlights” that lets users share photos and videos that will only be temporarily visible to their friends. Skype which has huge brand recognition and Microsoft funding for software development makes very little money. Microsoft hopes this redesign focused on messaging and social sharing will drive its...
  • May 15, 2014

    Hand’s On With Ham Radio

    Radio Shack’s original and core customer used to be the young man who was a tinkerer: ham and shortwave radio operators, guys who hacked telephones and built their own stereo components and even some early computer builders. Now kids are passively entertained with a cornucopia of electronic gadgets bought with mummy and daddy’s money and built in Asian factories. They would rather surf YouTube and Facebook then open up a Popular Mechanics magazine. They would rather make vine videos then make gadgets themselves. Before the internet was available in the 90’s you did not watch Netflix for entertainment you took apart your Nintendo to see how it worked. The guys who were interested in electronics did some impressive stuff. Some of you may remember Heathkits. You could build a powerful stereo system from their components for about half the cost of a store-bought version. These were very popular, and the guys who built them justifiably proud of their work. Some of the guys I knew who did this sort of thing went on to successful careers in computers and electronics. Shop classes are electives. Vocational education like automotive, electronics and computers are guaranteed jobs yet college kids pick majors where no jobs are available. Entertainment is a completely passive experience as well. Pride in something you built yourself has been replaced by pride in how far you’ve advanced in Angry Birds or Candy Crush. If kids today don’t get exposed to hands-on activities in their teens, if they’re not forced by boredom or financial need to build stuff, it’s ‘highly unlikely they’ll seek out, or have the aptitude for the ultimate in hands-on careers.
  • August 27, 2013

    Pipelight A Way To Get Netflix On Linux

    Pipelight is a new open-source project for getting Microsoft Silverlight applications to run within web-browsers on Linux, including the widely sought after Netflix Player on Linux. The Pipelight project for Silverlight in Linux browsers works with any browser supporting the Netscape Plugin API (e.g. Firefox) and consists of a Linux library loaded by the web-browser and also a Windows program started in Wine. The fake Windows program simulates a browser and loads the Silverlight DLL libraries. The Pipelight work by the developers included implementing the necessary Digital Rights Management support for Netflix within Wine. Pipelight consists out of two parts: A Linux library which is loaded into the browser and a Windows program started in Wine. The Windows program, called pluginloader.exe, simply simulates a browser and loads the Silverlight DLLs. When you open a page with a Silverlight application the library will send all commands from the browser through a pipe to the Windows process and act like a bridge between your browser and Silverlight. The used pipes do not have any big impact on the speed of the rendered video since all the video and audio data is not send through the pipe. Only the initialization parameters and (sometimes) the network traffic is send through them.
  • On April 19, Netflix launched all 13 episodes of Hemlock Grove, a horror thriller from Eli Roth.  In Netflix’s quarterly report they stated “We’re very pleased with its early performance. Hemlock Grove was viewed by more members globally in its first weekend than was House of Cards and has been a particular hit among young adults.” This caused Netflix stocks to rise very heavily.  Putting Netflix stock at a high it had not seen in sometime since the huge drop after the whole quickster debacle a few years ago. So far more people have watched the new supernatural show than the political drama House of Cards.  Hemlock Grove along with House of Cards, clearly shows the company’s desire to be a media player similar to HBO and Showtime. It appears that Netflix’s original content strategy is paying off, with more than 3 million new subscribers signing up last quarter. That brings Netflix’s total membership to more than 36 million members. Netflix’s next original content offering is a new season of the cult comedy TV show Arrested Development. All 15 episodes of that series will be available on May 26.  Netflix original programming will also add ‘Orange is the New Black’ on July 11th.
  • May 4, 2013

    Netflix Loses Almost 1,800 Titles

    Netflix users will see nearly 1,800 titles disappear from the video streaming service.  The video streaming service is losing titles from MGM, Universal and Warner Bros. because its licensing agreements with the movie studios have expired.  Classic movie titles like “Dr. No,” “Goldfinger” and “Thieves Like Us” will no longer be available for Netflix instant streaming. Netflix titles have a tendency to come and go from the service, and are rotated out if they are not watch frequently enough.  Netflix will add more than 500 titles May 1, but we also have titles expiring, this ebb and flow happens all the time. This isn’t Netflix’s first major loss of content. In 2012, Starz let its licensing agreement with the video streaming service expire and Netflix lost another 800 hours of programming from the History Channel and A&E Nexflix says losing the titles won’t hurt its business because it doesn’t want to be a clearing house of rentals. Netflix goal is to be an “expert programmer,” not a “broad distributor” of online content.