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Windows 7

  • There has been lots of news recently about Microsoft making Windows 7 End of Life (EOL) on January 14, 2020. To start with Microsoft has been releasing pop up messages to Windows 7 users saying “After 10 years, support for Windows 7 is nearing the end. January 14, 2020 is the last day Microsoft will offer security updates and technical support for computers running Windows 7. We known can be difficult, that’s why we’re reaching out early to help you backup your files and prepare for what’s next.” Microsoft ending support for a version of Windows is very common and has happened many times over the decades but the concerning part is the number of machines still running Windows 7 that will no longer be getting security patches come January 14, 2020. In the recent March Report from Net Marketshare you can see that Windows 7 is still the majority of Windows computers on the web by 39.60 percent followed by Windows 10 at 38.17% . As of October 2014, there were nearly 2 billion personal computers used worldwide that includes all Windows versions, Mac, Linux, BSD, and Chromebooks. That means that when Windows 7 end of life is reached 780,000,000 machines will not be patched for security issues by Microsoft. When Windows XP went end of life it was 28% of computers on the web and if you remember Microsoft kept patching it for a little while after EOL. I still think Microsoft is going to hold strong on the Windows 7 end of life date but signs do point to them possibly hanging on to supporting Windows 7 longer. For starters, they are working on a Beta for Microsoft Edge for Windows 7 in the new Microsoft Edge Insider Channel which should be released over the summer. Browser...
  • Windows 7 users have started to report the appearance of a pop-up message from Microsoft informing them that support for the operating system is coming to an end. While this will not come as a surprise to everyone, not all Windows 7 users will be aware that Microsoft is on the verge of dropping the ageing OS. We have already seen pop-ups encouraging users to update to Windows 10 but now Microsoft is turning up the pressure, telling Windows 7 users: “After 10 years, support for Windows 7 is nearing the end”. People have been reporting that the message started appearing as early as April 18, but not all Windows 7 users are seeing it yet. The message includes a link to a Microsoft website that encourages people to backup their data, buy a modern computer and make the jump to Windows 10. The full message reads: After 10 years, support for Windows 7 is nearing the end. January 14, 2020 is the last day Microsoft will offer security updates and technical support for computers running Windows 7. We know change can be difficult, that’s why we’re reaching out early to help you backup your files and prepare for what’s next. Via Beta News
  • With Windows 7 support ending in just 10 months, Microsoft revealed today that it will begin nagging users to upgrade to Windows 10. Or, as Microsoft calls it, a “courtesy reminder.” “Beginning next month, if you are a Windows 7 customer, you can expect to see a notification appear on your Windows 7 PC,” Microsoft’s Steve Clark explains. “This is a courtesy reminder that you can expect to see a handful of times in 2019.” One might naturally wonder how Microsoft could institute such a thing, given the effect that previous nag screens had on its customers and the ensuing bad PR. But Barlow says that the firm is doing this now to be proactive, so that its users can begin preparing for the migration away from Windows 7 early. And Microsoft has at least learned one lesson from the past: Let users decide what they see in Windows. “These notifications are designed to help provide information only and if you would prefer not to receive them again, you’ll be able to select an option for ‘do not notify me again,’ and we will not send you any further reminders,” he notes. One thing Clark doesn’t mention is any effort by Microsoft to ease the transition to Windows 10 by making the upgrade free again. There are probably pragmatic reasons for this, among them that most PCs out in the world today still running Windows 7 are probably older and can’t upgrade to Windows 10, or will provide a diminished experience. And this warning is, of course, for individuals and small businesses only: Microsoft revealed back in January that it will allow its biggest commercial customers to continue paying for Windows 7 support for three years past that system’s January 2020 support expiration. It is not making that same offer...
  • Today is an important date to note for Windows 7 users, because in exactly a year’s time, on January 14, 2020, all support for the operating system will cease, meaning that Microsoft will no longer deliver updates or critical security patches. In other words, you’ve only got a year left before you need to consider moving to Windows 10 (or some manner of alternative). Mainstream support for Windows 7 ended back in January 2015, but extended support, whereby Microsoft continues to deliver updates and fixes any vulnerabilities in the OS, runs for a further five years. So as mentioned, that means it all comes to a grinding halt in January 2020. TechRadar 364 days and counting.
  • In many cases there are a need create a collection with either all Windows 7 – x86 or all Windows 7 x64 installed.This can be used for targeting only a specific platform with an update or a program. I do this by querying the SCCM inventory, SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.SystemType which returns “x64-based PC”or “X86-based PC”. Query to find all Windows 7 – x64 select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM on SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId inner join SMS_G_System_OPERATING_SYSTEM on SMS_G_System_OPERATING_SYSTEM.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId where SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.SystemType = “x64-based PC” and SMS_G_System_OPERATING_SYSTEM.Caption like “Microsoft Windows 7%” And the query for Windows 7 -x86 select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM on SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId inner join SMS_G_System_OPERATING_SYSTEM on SMS_G_System_OPERATING_SYSTEM.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId where SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.SystemType = “X86-based PC” and SMS_G_System_OPERATING_SYSTEM.Caption like “Microsoft Windows 7%”
  • September 26, 2013

    How To Automatically Logon To Windows 7

    1. Click on Start and then enter the following command in the search box netplwiz Press the ENTER key This command will load the Advanced User Accounts Control Panel applet. 2. In the Users tab, uncheck the box next to Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer. 3. Click on the Apply button at the bottom of the User Accounts window. 4. When the Automatically Log On dialog box appears, enter the user name you wish to automatically login to Windows 7 with. Then enter your account password in the two fields where it’s asked. 5. Click the OK button. 6. Click OK on the User Accounts window to complete the process. From now on, when your PC starts up, Windows 7 will log on automatically.
  • 1. Log in with temp profile. 2. Start registry editor by typing regedit in find box of Windows 7. 3. Navigate the following location. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionProfileList 4. You will see similar keys under profile list, but one with .bak 5. The key with .bak is for the correct old profile. Currently your Windows 7 computer logged in with fresh (temporary) profile with same key. So, rename the new profile key ( which is not having.bak) and remove .bak from correct profile key. 6. Log off and log in (or restart) with your user name and password. You must get your correct profile with icons and profile settings back in Windows 7
  • March 1, 2013

    Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7

    Microsoft has finally released Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7.  Internet Explorer 10 which debuted with Windows 8 four months ago is now downloadable.  For now IE 10 is an optional update, though Microsoft will be adding it as a silent background update for IE 9 users in the next few weeks. Available in 95 languages IE 10 is a huge step forward for Microsoft’s bringing much better web standards support and considerable speed improvements over IE 9. Microsoft claims Windows 7 users should see a 20 percent increase in performance over IE 9, as well as better battery life on Windows 7 laptops.  IE 10 also brings better support for modern web tools like CSS 3, HTML5 and related APIs, making life considerably easier for web developers everywhere. IE10 continues Redmond’s efforts to reclaim its status as the top Web-surfing option. Over the years, IE has slowly ceded ground to competitors such as Chrome and Firefox.  While IE 10 is launching strong, Microsoft’s browser typically has a very lengthy release cycle compared to Chrome or Firefox, which both release smaller updates more frequently. Indeed, both IE alternatives are likely to see dozens of updates and improved web standards support before IE sees anything similar. Internet Explorer 10 is of course not without its list of problems as usual Bing bar is an adon for Internet Explorer.  It by default is not compatible with IE 10 for windows 7.  Internet Explorer 10 has been released to Windows 7 to address yet another security flaw in Adobe’s Flash Player.  We will have to see how well Internet Explorer matches up against security in weeks to come.
  • November 2, 2012

    No Service Pack 2 For Windows 7

    Perhaps serving as further proof that Microsoft is supremely confident in Windows 8 and expects nothing less than success, it’s being reported that Windows 7 will not see a second Service Pack.  It’s still unusual for Microsoft to stop after Service Pack 1 but over course of the last decade we have seen Service packs on the decline Windows 2000 – Service Pack 4 Windows XP – Service Pack 3 Windows Vista – Service Pack 2 Windows 7 – Service Pack 1 It took three years for Microsoft to release an Service Pack 2 for Windows XP. Which was delayed might I add because of the blaster issue which affected so many people.  As of last month, it’s been three years since the release of Windows 7 in October 2009. People familiar with the matter have hinted that Windows 8 could mark the end of service packs, as a similar strategy could be extended to all the other operating systems in Microsoft’s product family.  Service Packs are expensive and time consuming for Microsoft to develop and deploy.  IT Professionals then have to deal with the task of deploying them on large scale networks, and cleaning up the pieces. Service Packs are handy because they contain numerous security and performance updates all rolled into one, saving IT managers and home consumers time when it comes to patching Windows and making sure they’re up to date on new systems. Windows 7 users will have to update their operating systems every month until support for this particular version is no longer offered.  Which in my personal option will not be supported as long as XP which just never seems to go away.