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Day: August 8, 2017

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  • John Dumoulin has never really set foot in an office. He works part time at Chick-fil-a. But the 17-year-old from northern Virginia is the undisputed king of that bane to office workers everywhere — the spreadsheet. Dumoulin won an international competition on Microsoft Excel proficiency, earning $10,000 in prize money along the way. Dumoulin learned about the competition after taking an IT class at school in which he earned certifications on various office software products. As it turned out, his score on the Microsoft Excel 16 certification exam was the highest in Virginia, qualifying him for a national competition in Orlando, Florida. New York Post I would have never guessed this was a thing. I knew about Microsoft certifications but not a championship.  
  • This morning I was on a call with AMD and they are now able to confirm they have reproduced the Ryzen “segmentation fault issue” and are working with affected customers. AMD engineers found the problem to be very complex and characterize it as a performance marginality problem exclusive to certain workloads on Linux. The problem may also affect other Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD, but testing is ongoing for this complex problem and is not related to the recently talked about FreeBSD guard page issue attributed to Ryzen. AMD’s testing of this issue under Windows hasn’t uncovered problematic behavior. Phoronix I give AMD credit an issue was brought to their attention and they are addressing it great customer service.
  • YouTube’s experimental app Uptime, which lets you watch videos with friends while reacting and commenting, has now opened up to all users. The app was first launched in March of this year, from Google’s internal incubator, Area 120, as a means of testing a more interactive and social way to watch YouTube. Instead of viewing YouTube videos on your own, then sharing those you like with friends via links in chats or to social networks, Uptime lets you watch videos with friends directly in its app. Friends can either co-watch with you in real-time, or they can join later to see others’ reactions to the videos played back as they watch, giving Uptime a lively and interactive feel even when you’re watching alone. Techcrunch I really like this idea. I have wanted something like this for a while I think this could be a real competitor for Snapchat and Facebook Messanger.